Thursday, February 26, 2009

English Logistics and military administration 871-1066:The Impact of the Viking Wars

By Richard Abels

King Harold Godwineson is remembered as one of the great `losers' in history, the man who provided William the Bastard with the opportunity to earn a more flattering sobriquet. Harold's defeat at Hastings has obscured not only the very real military talents that earned him victories over formidable Welsh and Viking opponents bur, more importantly, the sophistication of the military organization chat he and other late Anglo-Saxon kings possessed. Scholars have not sufficiently appreciated Harold's logistical accomplishments in the summer and autumn of 1066. Learning of William's invasion plans. Harold summoned in May a massive naval and land force, characterized in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as "larger than any king had assembled before in this country." He billeted his troops along the southern coast of England and harbored his fleet throughout the summer and early autumn on the Isle of Wight, awaiting William's move.1 Finally, on 8 September, at least two months after the army and fleet had been assembled, provisions finally ran out and the troops returned home. Almost immediately thereafter Harold learned of the invasion of Harald Hardrada, hurriedly assembled a new army and forced marched it some 200 miles along the Great North Road to Stamford Bridge, then, after a hard fought and bloody victory, he forced marched the survivors south to confront William at Hastings.2

via English Logistics and military administration.

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